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The greatly anticipated programme for Build2Perform Live has been revealed with over 60 free-to attend sessions delivering high quality content and speakers taking place at London’s Olympia on 21 and 22 November 2017.

The Chartered Institution of Building Services Engineers (CIBSE), have reached out to their extensive international network of building performance experts to curate a programme dedicated to helping the supply chain improve efficiency and save money through effective building services.

CIBSE Divisions and Special Interest Groups are hosting 20 half-day streams of engaging and interactive content focusing on the building performance themes of wellbeing, digital engineering, and energy. Delivering case studies, best practice advice and debates that are relevant to both the domestic and non-domestic sectors, attending Build2Perfom Live is essential for anyone that is involved in ensuring buildings perform.

Programme highlights include a substantial focus on wellbeing, with best practice case studies from Cundall and Arup on how to design lighting for user welllbeing, proven strategies for maintaining air quality in buildings, natural ventilation, and an overview of upcoming updates to CIBSE guidance in TM40 on Health and Wellbeing and CIBSE Guide L: Sustainability.
Digital engineering will also take centre stage across the two days with a focus on digital processes that facilitate faster and more accurate design stage work, and how building services construction, commissioning and facilities management has been improved by digital practices.

Build2Perform will also be championing the drive towards greater industry collaboration and the reduction in energy use of buildings, from design through to operation. Sessions on energy include a spotlight on building simulation, procurement, metering, and the important role that facilities managers play post-occupancy.

Playing a key role in Build2Perform Live is CIBSE’s Young Engineers Network. Their stream ‘how to engage better with clients’ features a challenge for participants to work together and generate ideas for moving building performance higher up the priority list for developers.

The CIBSE CPD accredited programme has been carefully curated by  CIBSE DivisionsCIBSE Special Interest Groups and our  Build2Perform Advisory Committee, with specialist speakers invited from across the built environment.

Build2Perform Live, will also include two CIBSE accredited CPD Exhibitor Theatres, with Platinum and Gold exhibitors presenting, and a Headline Theatre with daily keynote addresses (full details will be announced in September).

Peter Y Wong CEng FCIBSE, President of CIBSE, said: “It is very exciting to reveal the programme for what is sure to be one of the biggest and most dynamic events that CIBSE has ever created. Building performance is a fast-moving area of our industry, and we have planned a programme of new and innovative sessions to reflect the pace of that change.
“As chartered engineers we have taken on the responsibility of making sure the work we do is not just highly functional, but also highly sustainable and future-proof. By attending Build2Perform Live, our guests will get a first-hand view of some of the most exciting work being done in the industry, and learn how to apply that best practice to make good engineering great.”
Find out more about Build2Perform Live and register for your free place at http://www.build2perform.co.uk/.

If you are interested in exhibiting or sponsoring CIBSE Build2Perform Live please contact Steve Webb at Step Place Events.

The Build2Perform Live Advisory Committee met on 5th July 2017 for the last time to finalise the free two-day seminar programme.

This year’s programme has been created in collaboration with CIBSE’s four Societies and nineteen Special Interest Groups, and visitors will be able to choose from over twenty streams with three sessions each.

There will also be two additional theatres delivering CIBSE accredited CPD from our Platinum and Gold exhibitors, and a headline theatre.

Seminar programme taster:

  • Building services: Technology update
  • Building simulation
  • CHP & District heating
  • Digital engineering
  • Energy metering best practice
  • Engaging clients with building performance
  • Fire safety
  • Good practice in the design of homes
  • How facilities management supports building performance
  • How to reduce energy unit costs
  • Improving indoor and outdoor Air Quality
  • Lighting and wellbeing
  • Making heritage buildings perform
  • Overheating in homes

Register now and receive priority booking when the programme is launched at the end of July.

2 days, 9 theatres, 20 streams, +25 exhibitors, +300 companies registered

CIBSE have agreed upon a major reinvention and to re-brand the CIBSE Conference & Exhibition in 2017 as Build2Perform Live taking place on the 21 & 22 November 2017 at Olympia, London. The new plans were revealed by CIBSE President, John Field at the at the Chartered Institution of Building Services Engineers (CIBSE) Building Performance Awards 2017 this week.

CIBSE have agreed upon a major reinvention and to re-brand the event in 2017 as Build2Perform Live which will offer a bigger exhibition with more interactive features, multiple seminar streams and occupy a whole floor at London’s Olympia Exhibition Centre, enabling us to deliver the full range of activities, presentations, formats and subjects required by delegates to extract maximum professional and business value from their visit. The flexible format will allow delegates to tailor their time to take full advantage of the expert presentations which continue to be the ‘heart’ of the event

Key companies have already signed up to support the event including ABB, Apollo-Fire Detectors Ltd, Herz Valves UK Ltd, Lochinvar Ltd, MagiCAD (Progman Software UK Ltd), Monodraught, Pegler Yorkshire Group Ltd, Sauter Automation Ltd, others will be announced over the next few weeks. ‘In total we expect to have 60 exhibitors, 20 Divisions and CIBSE Groups represented, and interaction from CIBSE Young Engineers and Volunteer Groups’ said CIBSE Services Managing Director, Rowan Crowley.

Major features already planned include:

5 Presentation areas offering no fewer than 20 half-day programmes over the two days. The programmes will be developed by CIBSE’s Divisions (Society of Public Health Engineers, Society of Light and Lighting, Society of Façade Engineers, Institution of Local Exhaust Ventilation); Specialist Interest Groups (including Energy Performance, Intelligent Buildings, Natural Ventilation); and Steering Groups, such as the BIM/Digital Steering Group. All programmes will be developed under the guidance of the Editorial Board in order to ensure quality and ‘take away’ value.

2 CPD Theatres will allow Platinum and Gold exhibitors to deliver valuable and specific material to visitors through CIBSE CPD-accredited presentations.

200-seater Headline Theatre for keynote speakers on both days, as well as for Awards presentations scheduled  to be presented at lunch-times and the first evening.

Volunteer Zone: CIBSE has many ‘volunteers; who work tirelessly in Regions, Specialist Interest Groups, Technical Committees, and more. The Zone will provide high quality ‘soft skills’ training designed to assist them in both their professional and volunteer activities: from managing meetings and events, to how to use social media to best effect.

60 exhibition stands: more exhibitors than ever will be invited to showcase the latest technologies and innovations. For the first time, exhibitors will be able to use the event website to invite their clients to pre-book appointments and ensure their time at the show is utilised effectively.

Build2Perform Live is designed to deliver value to both CIBSE members and to the full supply chain with which they work closely.

Full details are available from Steve Webb or Becky MacArthur on 01892 518877 or email: stevewebb@stepex.com

One of the main topics at last week’s CIBSE Building Performance Conference and Exhibition, indoor air quality is fast being recognised as a priority concern in the world of wellbeing. But in a field where marginal gains are everything, being on top of your data is very important Arie Taal from the Department of Mechanical Engineering at The Hague University has produced research into eliminating faults in HVAC using a BMS

Carbon Dioxide based demand control ventilation (DCV) can reduce heating/cooling loads by up to 30% and fan power consumption by up to 35%.  DCV maintains the CO2 concentration in a room within an appropriate range by adjusting the supply air flowrate.  CO2-based DCV is the most commonly used control method with CO2 sensors installed in the main return air duct.  Nowadays, the increased requirement for smart buildings, combined with a decrease of CO2 sensor prices, has resulted in buildings being equipped with more sensors.

A common issue occurs when one of the CO2 sensors encounters a fault.  This can be down to a lack of maintenance or incorrect sensor placements in rooms.  In a DCV system, a fault can mean that the estimated energy savings and air quality is not guaranteed.  In 1993 the Automatic Background Calibration (ABC) method was developed to calibrate CO2 sensors with the idea that CO2 levels would drop outside normal levels in buildings that are not occupied on weekends or weekday evenings. However, placement of sensors can become a problem as rooms on the inner side of a building or rooms with well-sealed windows may never drop outside of these baseline levels.
Alongside Dr Yang Zhao and Prof Wim Zeiler at the Department of the Built Environment, Eindhoven University in the Netherlands, Mr Taal has been working toward a systematic method of diagnosing faults in CO2 sensors.  Using automatic fault detection, diagnosis and self-correction in CO2 sensors would be a proactive method in air conditioning systems to solve this problem.  The premise of Mr Taal’s study has been to show how the automatic commissioning of CO2 sensors in air conditioning systems is achievable using benchmark values obtained in one of two methods.

In conventional methods, sensor faults are detected by comparing their measurements with benchmark values.  These values can be obtained manually, measured by technicians, or calculated automatically using other available measurements.  The latter is more common because it can be done automatically in the building management system (BMS).  Practical issues arise in air conditioning systems because there are no sensors equipped to measure the CO2 generation rate, CO2 concentration in the supply air and the flow rate of the supply air in m3/s.  In the development of models for CO2 sensor fault detection, the lack of information poses a real challenge.

In an effort to eliminate the threat posed by this lack of information the idea is to perform one of two test methods under specific operating conditions to ascertain the required benchmark levels.

The first is to recycle air without adding any outdoor air for between one and two hours to create 100% return air ventilation.  By closing all windows, doors and fresh air dampers in air handling units the measurements of all CO2 sensors should theoretically be the same.  The second test is full outdoor ventilation, to supply fresh air into the building without any recycling for between one and two hours.  Again, at the end of the time period all of the CO2 sensors should be the same and equal the CO2 concentration of the ambient air.

Faulty sensors will be detected if their readings are different from the assessed benchmark values.  A faulty sensor can be detected if its measurements are obviously higher or lower than other sensors.

In the first method, the degree of fault is then measured from the difference between the defective sensor and the average measurement of the other faultless CO2 sensors. The second compares the faulty sensor reading to the ambient CO2 concentration both looking for a negative or positive bias in CO2 levels when measured against the benchmark.

Self-correction is the final step in the process where all of the information is taken from the faulty sensor for adjustment.  Using the assessment results from the fault diagnosis the CO2 bias can be corrected.  The results of the detection, diagnosis and self-correction will then be reported to technicians for reference.

Together with his team, Mr Taal produced a simulation of their works on the first floor of a school building at The Hague University in Delft.  In their experiment, nine rooms were used with a CO2-based DCV applied to control the amount of supply air to each room in order to keep the CO2 measurements within the benchmark.  Separate experiments were conducted to simulate different conditions. The first simulates a fault free operation and a second introduces faulty sensors to show the impacts of automatic fault detection system.

Using two operating methods to obtain CO2 benchmarks, 100% return air ventilation and full outdoor air ventilation; faulty sensors can be detected, diagnosed and self-corrected using a BMS.  From the simulations, results show that after 45 minutes there are obvious differences between functional sensors and those that are faulty.  After an hour and a half the positive or negative bias can be accurately measured.

Theoretically, the proposed methods are effective ways to detect faulty CO2 sensors, effectively diagnoses the state of failure and to automatically remove the fault.  The ability to automatically detect, diagnose and repair faults is vital to the effective running of DCV systems.

The performance gap is the big problem of our times in the building services industry, and hundreds of column inches are devoted to products created to fix it each year. Ahead of his presentation at the CIBSE Conference Casey Cole, Managing Director of Guru Systems, presents an alternative view: That process, not technology, is the answer  

New buildings in the UK consume far more energy than predicted by their designers – up to 10 times more according to an Innovate UK study. This performance gap doesn’t arise because we lack technology. Studies by the UKGBC and others conclude that it’s the result of failings throughout the project life-cycle, from concept to handover.

Performance gaps may arise because clients are unclear about what they want; project teams don’t understand the impact of their design choices; contractors substitute products and materials on the fly and then install them poorly; or quality assurance is lax, with employers’ agents either blind to the problems or willing to let shoddy work escape their net.

There’s no doubt about it – we’ve got trouble right here in the UK building industry. But innovation on its own won’t solve the problem. The Internet of Things isn’t coming to the rescue. Because the performance gap isn’t a technology problem – it’s a problem of people, information and accountability.

That’s a sobering realisation, because we’ve all drunk the same Silicon-Valley-brand of neoliberal Kool-Aid. We know that given the right market signals, some whizzy new technology that no one has yet thought of will appear and address any problem you can name: from climate change to… well, to the performance gap.

But not this time. Any purely technological solution would simply be papering over the cracks in our poorly functioning buildings, cracks that were put there by project teams.

There’s a positive side to our realisation: if we don’t need new technologies to close the performance gap, then we already have the tech we need. Indeed, I think we do. But, that technology must be used to empower clients, engineers and all of us on the project team to do our jobs better. Here’s how:

The first step is to collect data from existing buildings. Organisations like CBx, Digital Catapult and Guru Systems, the company where I work, are already doing this. This data is being collected from utility meters (e.g. smart meters and heat meters), building energy management systems and other monitoring systems. By analysing this data, we can understand which factors have the biggest influence on performance.

We can then set clear performance requirements and explicit means of measuring them. These must be measurable before the building reaches practical completion, while the people who can put it right are still on site. It’s no use specifying kWh/m2/annum or any other target that can only be calculated once the building is occupied. By the time they can be measured, the project team will have long since moved on. So, we must define requirements for the characteristics that are measurable before occupation and that lead to good performance in operation.

Most importantly, clients must make performance requirements contractual. Those clear, measurable objectives must be written into the invitation to tender and then into contract. The lead contractor and the rest of the delivery team must know from the outset what’s expected of them (and that they’ll be held accountable for achieving it). We have a number of clients that have now adopted this approach for heat networks and they’ve shown that, once it’s contractual, everyone’s incentives align and the gap between expectation and outcome closes.

Casey Cole is speaking on ‘Are you ready for a digital future?’ at the CIBSE Building Performance Conference on Thursday, November 17 from 10:25am to 11:20am.

In this week’s #Build2Perform blog, we’re getting a bonus word from CIBSE President John Field. As well as his regular Presidential blog, he’s written for us about his thoughts ahead of the 3rd Building Performance Conference and Exhibition on 17th and 18th November – how it’s relevant, how it ties into the future of building services, and why it’s exciting!

As CIBSE President one of the biggest and most exciting honours that we get in the job is to preside over a CIBSE Conference. Now in its third year, the Conference is an opportunity to mingle with and hear from some of the biggest names in our industry and grapple with the big issues of the next few years. This year I’m also chairing the second day, in which we’ll be looking at some of the major organisational challenges within the industry such as collaboration and new technology.

The most interesting thing about the Conference is that, while it obviously has a big industry focus, we’re also directly engaging with some of the most significant challenges that the whole world faces over the next hundred years. Climate change, overpopulation, energy security, health and quality of life are all well within our remit, and it’s at events like this that you can truly see how important a position building services engineers occupy in society. We make the modern world work, and this is where we look at how to make it better.

Our key theme this year is ‘Inspiration’, which is hard to pin down but crucial to the future of the way we work. Given all I’ve said about engineers’ place in the world, we still don’t occupy as central a place as we ought to in positions of power – contributing to planning and policy making in the many areas to which we contribute. Unlike lawyers and bankers, engineers don’t have much representation in the UK Government. Our voices often go unheard and our advice unheeded, and we need to change that. We need to fight for influence and be prepared to challenge other engineers, other professions, politicians and the media in order to make sure sustainable and sensible policies in the built environment are top of the agenda.

With that in mind, we’ll be looking into both the past and the future on our first day. Celebrating anniversaries at their own companies and in the 40th year since the creation of CIBSE in its current form, Patrick Bellew of Atelier Ten and Max Fordham will be looking back at how the traditional role of the building services engineer has changed in the last 50 years. Then we’ll be looking forwards – why have warnings about building performance been ignored by Governments past, what can we do to change that, and what is coming up in the legislation pipeline that will affect our industry in future?

We’re also getting to the bottom of a couple of burning issues in the industry. Air quality will be the subject of a number of talks, ranging from external air quality’s effect on the indoor environment to the ways in which indoor air quality can be improved in homes and schools. We’ll also be re-visiting the theme of collaboration from last year’s Conference, looking at what we’ve learned since then and examining the role that individual sectors have to play in the industry as a whole – from the supply chain to facilities managers.

As well as looking at the nuts and bolts of building performance, the Conference is a great chance to debate the big ideas as well. Talking about grander themes and longer-term ambitions is a great way to focus our minds on the potential of our industry, and the differences we can make to the world. We’ll be taking a look at the perfect world: What society would look like if all buildings achieved their best engineering outcomes. We’ll be looking at the imperfect world: What are the true health impacts of air pollution? And we’ll be looking at a better world: How can we ‘turn old into gold’ and make the most of the UK’s current building stock through retrofit.

It is this combination of the practical and the aspirational that makes the Conference so exciting, and the interaction of the two is at the heart of what is going to drive our industry forwards. We know that our industry represents some of the most knowledgeable technical experts in the world, and that we can do amazing things when we bring this knowledge to bear. We aim to create an environment where we can marry the two, and use our skill to make our vision happen. With a gallery of top experts here to speak, as well as over 500 people from across the industry, the Queen Elizabeth II Conference Centre is going to be an inspiring place for those two days in November, and we hope to see you there!

The CIBSE Building Performance Conference and Exhibition will be held on 17th and 18th November at the Queen Elizabeth Conference Centre in Westminster. For more info see the CIBSE Conference website.

At the upcoming CIBSE Building Performance Conference and Exhibition, we’re going to be focussing heavily on the future of the industry – particularly the ways that new technology can be brought to bear on performance in the built environment; to find easier, smarter and cheaper ways to make buildings perform to their potential in a variety of different ways.
This week, we’re speaking to two industry experts: Mat Colmer, Built Environment Specialist at the Digital Catapult Centre, and Nick Winser CBE, Chairman of the Energy Systems Catapult, who are giving is their views on technology in the built environment: What’s hot, what’s not and where the biggest changes are going to come.

What are the innovations in technology that will make the biggest impact to the performance of buildings in the next 15 years?

N W: I’m not sure there’s going to be a stand-out technology innovation, and fifteen years is actually not that long to make a big impact. A new home energy gateway that learns about the thermal performance of our buildings and the requirements of the occupants could provide a platform for all sorts of innovative energy services, with the potential to start a transformation in consumer and market engagement.

M C: Wireless sensor networks and IoT will have a big impact in the near term. Having reliable hyper-local networks that are off-the-shelf and interoperable will bring down the costs of monitoring our buildings, particularly monitoring the efficiency of services, and allow for products that encourage user feedback. This will allow us to gather far more information on what happens with buildings in-use.

What are the innovations in buildings that will make the biggest environmental impact in the next 15 years?

M C: Advances in curtailing energy use through intelligent metering and management, demand response and the wider use of DC power transmission will have a significant impact. Increased use of DC power additionally makes the prospect of decentralised power generation more attractive and can increase energy security.

N W: Energy efficiency itself isn’t a great driver of consumer action – for most people, spending money just to save kilowatt hours is not that attractive, and it’s unlikely to compete with other household demands. So whilst we must improve the effectiveness of efficiency measures, and reduce the cost, this needs to be coupled with imaginative new business models that refurbish living spaces, provide greater comfort, and as part of this deliver the required efficiency improvements.

If you could only recommend one change in process or method to improve building performance, what would it be?

N W: I think there’s a real need for focus, not just on the requirements of individual buildings, but for whole areas of our cities, towns and communities. Someone, and maybe it’s the local authority, should have the responsibility and design tools to develop local energy strategies that take account of house types, geography, supply networks and the availability of energy resources like waste heat. Growing consensus like this will be a massively important step to help individual occupants make the right future-proof decisions and find suppliers to deliver them.

M C: Make time to learn from the experience of others. Too often the same mistakes are made purely because time and budget constraints discourage creativity and encourage the familiar.

What is the most exciting potential collaboration opportunity in building services over the next 15 years?

M C: Advances in virtual reality and augmented reality technology will enable visual and interactive collaboration across sectors. Many problems in construction projects originate from poor communication. VR and AR technology allows partners to use shared spaces to explain and revise designs. Consequently misunderstandings and errors are less likely to occur.

N W: I think there’s a great opportunity for energy to be much more than a utility purchase. I’m sure we will see retail players who have trusted brands, using their reputations to develop new products that include home refurbishment with energy efficiency built in, and maybe other organisations that can bring a ‘lean’ process mindset to help advance the retrofitting of the nation’s buildings.

Welcome to the fourth #Build2Perform podcast! This month, we’re concentrating on the issue of indoor air quality. What is it, why is it important and what can engineers do about it? I’ll be speaking to two experts in air quality, independent sustainability consultant Julie Godefroy and Alan Fogarty of Cundall, to answer those questions and more!

You can listen to the podcast below, but you can also find it in the iTunes library and on other podcast apps by searching #Build2Perform if you’d like to listen on the move via smartphone or tablet. We’ll also be discussing the podcast on Twitter under the #Build2Perform, and you’ll find useful links about what you hear under the podcast below.Indoor air quality is becoming one of the next great public health issues of our time, and is being considered more and more by designers as a fundamental part of the building’s health. Overshadowed somewhat in the public eye by its outdoor cousin, more and more research is being carried out into an area that could claim more than 40,000 lives a year in the UK alone.One of the most recent and comprehensive studies carried out int his area is by the Royal College of Physicians, and takes in both indoor and outdoor data. CIBSE also has knowledge available specifically on the indoor component, such as KS17: Indoor Air Quality & Ventilation, published in 2011.

From a regulatory perspective, both the UK Government and the European Union have rules on indoor air quality standards, which are summed up by the Government here. Indoor air quality in the home and in schools is a major thread at this year’s CIBSE Conference and Exhibition. Sessions that deal directly with this issue are:

Performance, Inspiration and Aspiration are the keywords behind the 2016 Building Performance Conference and Exhibition, organised by the Chartered Institution of Building Services Engineers (CIBSE) as it officially launches this year’s programme.

Following on from CIBSE President John Field’s promise to inspire engineers to ‘talk the talk’ and fight for their place at the heart of modern life, this Conference will bring together over 40 expert speakers to showcase the latest thought on building performance and help engineers deliver and maintain high performing buildings.

The Conference, due to be held on 17 and 18 November at the QEII Centre in Westminster, is a chance for engaged industry professionals from the built environment  sector to meet, learn and debate the critical issues facing the industry, from health and wellbeing issues to maintenance and operational performance. It is already proving to be a popular event, having attracted the highest number of pre-registrations to date.

A series of leading speakers will tackle these issues, offering employable solutions in their addresses; including Outlook for Building Performance, Digital Engineering & Building Services, Achieving Performance In Use, Air Quality: Impact on Health & Wellbeing. Collaboration for Better Performance, Refurb + Retrofit, and Innovation in Buildings.

John Field, President of CIBSE and Chair of day two, said: “Engineers are at the centre of everyday life, we make the modern world work in obvious and not-so-obvious ways, and it’s in our power to help make the world a better place in many areas, from tackling climate change to improving how people live.

“The CIBSE Conference is an ideal time to get together and be inspired by what we have achieved, and what we can achieve in the future. Using what we learn in these sessions, we can take big ideas to business, the media and politicians and help shape the future of the UK, and make it a beacon for excellence in building performance for years to come.”

In the Conference programme, sessions include: ‘Are you ready for a digital future?’, ‘Build to Perform: Realising the commercial drivers and opportunities in high performing buildings, what the world could look like if all buildings achieved best engineering outcomes, Facilitating collaboration for optimum performance from teams and buildings, and High rise buildings on the up: What do the building services look like?

The Chartered Institution of Building Services Engineers is hosting the Building Performance Conference and Exhibition at the prestigious QEII Conference Centre in Westminster on 17-18 November 2016. Attendees will be able to meet and network with over 300 like-minded professionals, clients and suppliers from around the world.

 

The CIBSE Conference and Exhibition will inform and inspire building services professionals including consultants, designers, facilities managers and engineers, and offer up to 10 hours of CIBSE CPD.

On the first day of the conference 17 November 2016, we are delighted to have a very special interview between Patrick Bellew (left image) and Max Fordham (right image) on their visions of our future built environment, start the conference.

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Two of the most influential and well-known building services companies are celebrating significant anniversaries. Atelier Ten celebrated their 25th anniversary in 2015 and in 2016 Max Fordham LLP will be 50 years old.

The practices are led by iconic figures in building services engineering. Patrick Bellew, Atelier Ten, and Max Fordham at his eponymous company. These two giants of the industry will be interviewed together at the CIBSE Building Performance Conference 2016. Two of the industry’s most influential environmental engineers will share their visions and aspirations for the next 50 years in building services.

 

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